by Kim Lee February 09, 2019 2 min read

Omega oils are essential fatty acids (EFAs) that are especially vital to your dog’s health. Not only do they act as a crucial source of energy, they also contribute to your dog’s overall immune system and supports their skin and coat health. A lack of or inadequate amount of omega-3 and -6 in dogs can result in the disruption of critical body functions.

Omega-3 and Omega-6

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Both omega-3 and -6 are important additions to your dog’s diet, but it’s critical to strike the right balance between them. Here’s why: omega-3 and -6 work in an antagonistic manner. Omega-6 produces hormones that promote cell growth, blood clotting and  increase inflammation (an immune response). Omega-3 works opposingly to decrease inflammation and support the immune system. A good balance of both is imperative.

Omega-6 is present in a variety of products - meat, eggs, grains, vegetable oil, nuts, and seed. In fact, it’s so readily available that your dog’s diet might have too much of it - in which case, it’s recommended to amp up the omega-3 in their diet. Remember, strike a balance for a healthy immune system.

Omega-3 is a little harder to find since it mainly comes from fish - specifically cold water fish. Most dogs are omega-3 deficient and require complementary supplementation to their current diet. You could either go for a liquid fish oil (like Zeal’s) for easy addition into meals or opt for those in soft gel capsules (we likeDom & Cleo!) that prohibit oxidation.

The health benefits of Omega-3

1. Reduces Inflammation

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Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids work together in harmony to manage inflammation - O-6 increases while O-3 decreases, this is only possible if there’s a right balance of both. O-3 is especially helpful for dogs suffering from inflammatory conditions such as allergies and arthritis.

2. Joint Support

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Omega-3 provides joint support through its anti-inflammatory properties by maintaining the health of collagen and cartilages - giving your dog’s joints the extra boost that they need.

3. Supports Neural Development

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Studies have shown that the consumption of omega-3 fatty acids have helped to improve brain health of dogs. It boosts cognitive functions in senior dogs and aid in the mental development of puppies.

4. Promotes Cardiovascular Health

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Consistent supplementation of omega-3 can help to lower their blood cholesterol levels and maintain a healthy blood pressure. This decreases the chances of developing a heart disease. It also promotes weight loss in overweight dogs, the benefits of which carries over to overall cardiovascular health.

5. Improves Skin and Coat

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Omega-3 supports the skin and coat health which helps to relieve dry and itchy skins. The immune-boosting properties of O-3 assist in your dog’s natural skin defences. It also reduces instances of skin allergies, yeast infections and hotspots.


    Kim LeeKIM LEE
    Kim is an avid dog lover, serial guac and chips eater, and thrill seeker - all in one body. Currently chillin’ with her dogs.

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